E18 Physical Thing

C Battery Biscot Camp Luton

The Royal Artillery is unique in the British Army because of the emphasis they have always placed on their sub-units: known as batteries. Batteries can deploy independently, move around between regiments and even perform different roles to one another within a single regiment.

Biscot Camp was organised into 4 Batteries, with a Headquarters (HQ) component.

A, B, C, and D...B was later merged into A,C and D Battery.

Download the War Diaries for C battery below.

D Battery Biscot Camp Luton

The Royal Artillery is unique in the British Army because of the emphasis they have always placed on their sub-units: known as batteries. Batteries can deploy independently, move around between regiments and even perform different roles to one another within a single regiment.

Biscot Camp was organised into 4 Batteries and a headquarters (HQ) component.

A, B, C, and D...B was later merged into A,C and D Batteries.

Download the War Diaries for D battery below.

Hitchin Road Schools

In 1883 the Luton School Board (created in 1874) opened three schools in Hitchin Road, one each for junior boys, junior girls and infants.

Following the Education Act of 1944 the schools were classified as County Primary Junior School and County Primary Infants School, Bedfordshire County Council taking over the running of all schools in Luton but acting through Luton Borough Council as a Divisional Executive. Both schools were closed in 1967, pupils going to St.Matthew's Junior School and St.Matthew's Infants School.

The Soldier

"The Soldier" is a poem written by Rupert Brooke. The poem is the fifth of a series of poems entitled 1914. It is often contrasted with Wilfred Owen's 1917 antiwar poem Dulce Et Decorum Est. The manuscript is located at King's College, Cambridge.

If I should die, think only this of me:

That there's some corner of a foreign field

That is for ever England. There shall be

Anthem for Doomed Youth

"Anthem for Doomed Youth" is a well-known poem written by Wilfred Owen that incorporates the theme of the horror of war.

 

What passing-bells for these who die as cattle? 

Only the monstrous anger of the guns. 

Only the stuttering rifles' rapid rattle 

Can patter out their hasty orisons.

No mockeries now for them; no prayers nor bells; 

Nor any voice of mourning save the choirs, –

The shrill, demented choirs of wailing shells; 

And bugles calling for them from sad shires.

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